HomeLatest NewsFederal NewsSAMHSA Grants Available to Expand Overdose Prevention Programs

SAMHSA Grants Available to Expand Overdose Prevention Programs

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grants available to expand overdose prevention programs. Primary and behavioral health organizations, state and local governments and others can apply through Feb. 7 for a portion of $30 million from the American Rescue Plan Act to expand community-based drug overdose prevention programs, SAMHSA recently announced. The agency anticipates making 25 awards of up to $400,000 per year for three years to support efforts such as distributing overdose-reversal medications and fentanyl test strips, providing overdose education and counseling, and managing or expanding syringe services to help control the spread of HIV and hepatitis C.

NOFO Number: SP-22-001
Posted on Grants.gov:
Application Due Date:
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 93.243

Eligibility

Eligible applicants are States; local, Tribal, and territorial governments; Tribal organizations; non-profit community-based organizations; and primary and behavioral health organizations

Contact Information

Program Issues

Cara Alexander
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(240) 276-0578
DTPHarmReduction@samhsa.hhs.gov

Grants Management and Budget Issues

Office of Financial Resources, Division of Grants Management
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(240) 276-1400
FOACSAP@samhsa.hhs.gov

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